Tag Archives: treatments

Cannabidiol Update

strThis week the New England Journal of Medicine published a double-blind study on the effectiveness of Cannabidiol (CBD) on seizures demonstrating that it was safe and effective for kids whose seizures could not be effectively controlled with typical anticonvulsants. The publication of the study set off a media storm with the results reported in hundreds of newspapers and on electronic media. The actual study focused on individuals with a Dravet syndrome diagnosis and so it is difficult to know how well it can be applied to individuals with MECP2 duplication. Nevertheless, there are some interesting findings and likely impacts with potential implications. Continue reading

Drooling: Pros & Cons of Treatment

CAUTION2Many children and adults with MECP2 duplication syndrome experience excessive drooling. Some are treated medically to reduce this problem. This post discusses some of the pros and cons of medical treatment for drooling. Ptyalism and sialorrhea are medical terms that are medical terms that are sometimes used as synonyms for drooling although their precise definitions may differ slightly.

What causes drooling? There are two major Continue reading

MeCP2 and the adult brain

mouseA recent study looks at the effects of the MeCP2 protein levels on  adult brains. Although this study looked at blocking MeCP2 [similar to Rett syndrome and the opposite of MECP2 duplication syndrome], the fact that it showed different kinds of responses depending on the developmental maturity of the lab mice, suggests that the most critical role of the MeCP2 protein may be in the function of the adult brain.

This finding is consistent with Continue reading

Syndromes, Clinical Syndromes, Genetic Syndromes, and Associations

CAUTION2The term syndrome gets used a lot by healthcare professionals and by the public in general. Most people have a fairly good idea of what it means, but it may be helpful to look a little closer. Syndrome comes from a Greek word meaning concurrence, things that are commonly found together. So, syndrome is generally used to refer to a group or pattern of symptoms that typically go together.  That much is pretty straight forward. Sometimes, however, syndrome has a narrower, more specific meaning. Continue reading