Tag Archives: Family

Exempt CBD from Canadian Excise Tax

ExciseTAxAs currently proposed, the Canadian Cannabis Excise Tax will create an excessive economic burden on many sick and disabled Canadians. In many cases, it will add an additional $1000 or year or more to the existing federal taxes. The stated rationale for this tax is that recreational users may claim to be medical users in order to avoid the excise tax on recreational marijuana. This rationale, however, cannot be appropriately applied to Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, because CBD is not psychotropic, and CBD oil has no potential for recreational use. Therefore, adding an excise tax to CBD oils that contain only small amounts of THC, serves no purpose other than to create an additional financial burden of sick and disabled Canadians.

If you agree, please e-mail the Department of Finance Canada at fin.cannabis-taxation-cannabis.fin@canada.ca and tell them:

Exempt CBD oils that contain less than 3mg/ml of THC from the Canadian Cannabis Excise Tax. Taxing Low-THC CBD oils is unfair and unnecessary.

The Department of Finance will accept comments on the proposed tax until 7 December 2017 and you can view the entire proposal here: http://www.fin.gc.ca/n17/data/17-114_1-eng.asp

Let the Canadian Department of Finance know what you think about the proposed excise tax. Feel free to quote or draw on any part of this blog post, if that is helpful. Also feel free to share this post with anyone who may be interested.

For more details on why CBD should be exempted, see below:

About me I want to be clear about the fact that I have a personal stake in this matter. Our son’s doctor has prescribed CBD oil to help manage intractable epilepsy Continue reading

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Family Facts or Menacing Marriage Myths

It has been written 100s of times and repeated 100s of thousands of times:

Family Together - Parents and Kids, Wheelchair“…about 70 percent of US couples with disabled children get divorced”

“…the divorce rate among parents of autistic children is 75 percent”

“…parents [of children with developmental disabilities] have an 80% chance of divorce”

“… estimates put the divorce rate among parents of children with severe disabilities as high as four out of five marriages.”

“…upwards of a 90% divorce rate if there’s a damaged baby in the house”

but there are two problems with these statements. First, THEY ARE NOT TRUE and, more importantly, THEY ARE DANGEROUS. Continue reading

Caregiving, Altruism and Evolution

CAUTION2Christina was 36 years old when her sixth child was born. Her newborn daughter was different from the any of the others, and as time passed Christina began to realize that her new baby had a severe disability. Caring for this daughter would require Christina to change her life drastically, and those changes would dominate Christina’s life as long as her severely disabled daughter survived.

Not long after Darwin’s theory of evolution began to gain widespread acceptance, the notions like “survival of the fittest” and “the law of the jungle” popularized the idea that ruthless competition determined progress. This was based partly on a simplistic misunderstanding of evolution and partly on wishful thinking of powerful people who wanted to justify their own good fortune. Of course, it is true that competition within and among species is  important, but much more recently science has recognized the roles of cooperation and caregiving as being equally if not more important to survival.

Of course, it seems unlikely that that Christina knew anything about evolutionary theory. She simply responded to her daughter’s needs. An older daughter pitched in and helped Christina at times. Nevertheless, most of the caregiving remained with the mother’s job. Christina didn’t let others who were not family members share caregiving responsibilities. She carried her daughter wherever she went, and did the best she could as long as her child survived.

When I read CFamily Together - Parents and Kids, Wheelchairhristina’s story, I thought it sounded she sounded a lot like other parents of kids with severe disabilities that I have known. What was different was where Christina’s story was published; it was in the journal Primates. Christina  is wild chimpanzee living in the jungle in Tanzania.This Wall Street Journal  YouTube video provides a glimpse of Christina’s life with her daughter. Although this appears to be the first published study of caregiving for a severely disabled infant by chimpanzee, Christina’s caregiving behavior is not unique and it is not exclusive to primates. Caring for a disabled individual has been observed among a wide variety of animals.  For example, his story of a pack of Orca’s provides an interesting example of “Killer whales” caring for a disabled pod member by bringing him food because his disability makes it impossible to get his own food.

There is also paleontological evidence of the earliest humans and prehumans caring for severely disabled children; some  dating back 100,000 years or more. There are a number of examples of skeletal remains of children adolescents with evidence of significant disabilities have demonstrated that families (and most likely communities) cared for children and adolescents with severe disabilities during the paleolithic era. The skull and spines of these individuals reveal that they lived for many years with disabilities that would have been much too severe for them to survive without the help of caregivers.

In spite of all conflict, violence, and all of our human failings, humans have become the most successful species on this planet precisely because of our powerful will to care for each other. Families and communities caring for children and adults with severe disabilities exemplify this essential human quality.

 

Season’s Greetings

seasonsgreet

To all the affected families, to everyone who reads this blog, and to the rest of the world in general. Hope you have a great Christmas, Hanukah, Kwanza, Saturnalia, or whatever is meaningful to you. Some of you will be celebrating, some will be working, some will be struggling today, but I wish you all the best today, and for 2017.

2016 saw lots of progress toward research, but sadly saw too many families suffer the loss of cherished family members. Many more families had children diagnosed with MECP2 duplication syndrome this year. There were many new readers of this blog, and many new members of the MECP2 duplication syndrome Facebook Family Talk Group as well as other groups connecting families.

Best wishes to all the remarkable families that that are committed to caring for family members with severe and multiple disabilities.